Seville: Day 2

On Friday, October 28 we visited Seville’s Cathedral, one of the largest in Europe. Indeed, it appeared to be quite a bit larger than a sports arena such as Autzen Stadium. Like the Sagrada Familia, the grandeur of this Cathedral defies description in words and pictures. Nevertheless, we present here a few photos that provide a glimpse of this magnificent structure.

Seville Cathedral
Seville Cathedral

The Giralda Bell Tower is part of the Cathedral. It was originally built by the Moors and used as a minaret (a tower from which the Muslim calls to prayer were sung). You can see that the first six stories are of Moorish design. Later, the Christians added the bell tower portion on top.

Giralda Bell Tower
Seville Cathedral: Giralda Bell Tower
Seville Cathedral and Giralda Bell Tower
Seville Cathedral and Giralda Bell Tower
Seville Cathedral interior
Seville Cathedral interior
Seville Cathedral side altar
Seville Cathedral side altar
Flying buttresses
Flying buttresses atop Seville Cathedral

The Cathedral was originally a Mosque built by the Moors. The Courtyard of the Oranges is one of their legacies. Orange trees, irrigated by a system embedded in the paving stones, provide fruit and shade.

sev-cat-garden-560
Garden of the Oranges

If you look carefully at the top of the wall, above the arch, you can see a strangely comic face. We couldn’t figure out why that face was there. We asked a tour guide, and she told us that it is a sundial, but she couldn’t explain why it has such a cartoonish appearance.

sev-cat-face-480

Leaving the Cathedral, we considered visiting Real Alcázar, the Royal Palace built by the Moors in the 10th century and developed by the Spanish Christians after they drove the Moors out of Spain in 1492. Unfortunately, the line for admission to Real Alcázar seemed to stretch all the way back to Barcelona, so we opted for a guided tour for Sunday, which would guarantee a quick entry.

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